Food Tourism draws Millennials to unlikely destination

If you know anything about Millennials, you likely know about our love for food.

Past generations have shown appreciation for cuisine sure, but Millennials take this to a whole new level. Indeed, entire communities of Millennials have developed around food culture, dubbing themselves “Foodies”.

What does it mean to be a part of the “Foodie” community? Well, first and foremost, a desire to try new things. Millennial Foodies pride ourselves on our adventurous tastes. No longer do meat and potatoes suffice- instead we crave tacos, sashimi, kale smoothies, and raindrop cake.

But as any good Millennial Foodie will tell you, you can’t get raindrop cake just anywhere…

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Desire for unique food offerings are leading Millennials to travel far and wide to access new culinary experiences. But while you might expect travelers to target world centers like London and New York, so-called ‘Food Tourism’ is gaining popularity in places you might not expect.

Take, for example, Pittsburgh. Once known by Canadians only for its collapsed steel industry and Crosby-led hockey team, Pittsburgh is gaining traction among Millennials for its cool restaurant scene. The official Pittsburgh tourism website devotes an entire section to food. The Globe and Mail recently suggested that the city was the best city in America to eat a sandwich. Foodie ‘demigod’ Anthony Bourdain has long praised the city.

With a focus on experience rather than sustenance, Millennial Foodies are elevating tourism industries around the world.


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Which Millennial Type is most likely to travel to Pittsburgh for a Sandwich?: The Stampeder.